July 16, 2012 The south shore of Oahu is being invaded by something strange from sea, that even has sand crabs running for cover.

http://www.khon2.com/news/local/story/Oahus-south-shores-invaded-by-mysterious-creature/tvRsPwYrGEyfVb3BukcDew.cspx

posted by pumkinandstorm 2 years 4 months 1 week ago • 3,348 views • 2:49
criticalthud says...

welcome to mutation.
if you change the chemical composition of the atmosphere, a systemic compensation (change) will occur throughout the entire ecosystem.
which is why "climate change" should really be called "planet change".

TheSluiceGate says...

>> ^criticalthud:

welcome to mutation.
if you change the chemical composition of the atmosphere, a systemic compensation (change) will occur throughout the entire ecosystem.
which is why "climate change" should really be called "planet change".


Wow, you've had a peer reviewed paper published on this already?

criticalthud says...

>> ^TheSluiceGate:

>> ^criticalthud:
welcome to mutation.
if you change the chemical composition of the atmosphere, a systemic compensation (change) will occur throughout the entire ecosystem.
which is why "climate change" should really be called "planet change".

Wow, you've had a peer reviewed paper published on this already?


on a very similar subject, yes.

criticalthud says...

mutation is simply change, and it is happening all the time in the evolutionary process. but as you destabilize the ecosystem you are increasing the rate of mutation as life struggles to adapt.

AnimalsForCrackers says...

I think it's more likely a displaced population of some foreign crustacean (made even more ambiguous by being larval), either deep-sea or swept (maybe even migrated due to environmental change) from somewhere else.

Ryjkyj says...

Did you ever see "The Abyss?" James Cameron finally pissed off the creatures that live in the Earth's crust after his little sightseeing trip into the Marianas Trench!

BicycleRepairMan says...

>> ^criticalthud:

welcome to mutation.
if you change the chemical composition of the atmosphere, a systemic compensation (change) will occur throughout the entire ecosystem.
which is why "climate change" should really be called "planet change".


MUTATION DOES NOT WORK THAT WAY. GOODNIGHT!

Seriously tho, my guess is some kind of rare swarming of bottom-dwelling creatures that lives in deeper water. Perhaps overfishing in an area means millions of them have unexpectedly survived and washed ashore.

criticalthud says...

ok, let me explain in another way: the more you demand change from the ecosystem, the more you will get of it.

at times, this can actually be a very good thing.
at other times, it sucks for a while, but eventually, you end up with a more adaptable species. That is the process that is happening right now.

>> ^BicycleRepairMan:

>> ^criticalthud:
welcome to mutation.
if you change the chemical composition of the atmosphere, a systemic compensation (change) will occur throughout the entire ecosystem.
which is why "climate change" should really be called "planet change".

MUTATION DOES NOT WORK THAT WAY. GOODNIGHT!
Seriously tho, my guess is some kind of rare swarming of bottom-dwelling creatures that lives in deeper water. Perhaps overfishing in an area means millions of them have unexpectedly survived and washed ashore.


unexpectedly survived?

criticalthud says...

but let's assume it is a bottom dwelling creature. did they all get together at a starbucks and decide to hit hawaii for spring break?

the actions of the species is written into it's genetics. for it to suddenly move it's entire habitat, a genetic change would have had to occur ie: new instructions. that change is a mutation.

but looking at the crab, it looks like a creature that dwells near the surface. It does not resemble a deep water crustacean, at least not in my experience. Which means, it could be a new species. which means a mutation of another species.

BicycleRepairMan says...

unexpectedly survived?

Ok, I dont know much about marine biology, what I mean is that most crabs lay MILLIONS of eggs, most of these are eaten by fish and other creatures, in reality they neither expect to survive or expect to be eaten, they are just eggs, after all, and the same is true for the adult crabs, they simply lay the eggs and dont expect much at all, I assume. When I used the word "unexpectedly" in this context I mean that we, as observers, should expect most of them will be eaten.

I am suggesting that eggs that "should" have been eaten, wasn't.

Its all speculation on my part, of course, I was just trying to suggest a more-likely-than-mutation-explanation for their sudden appearence. Mutation doesnt have this kind of impact over a year or two, for mutations to change the creatures enough to change the way they reproduce, where they live, what they look like etc, you need mutations in hundreds of generations with selection. A mutation causing a sudden appearence of millions of indiviual organisms isnt likely at all.

Mutations doesnt work like in freaking Ninja Turtles, they dont just "create new species" like that. for a new species to be created you need mutations creating variations that are selected over many generations in isolation from the original species.

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